Michele Trabucchi
  • E-mail :[email]
  • Phone : 0489064256
  • Location : Nice, France
Last update 2016-08-04 11:01:00.282

Michele Trabucchi PhD

Course and current status

From January 2016                 Group Leader of an INSERM-label team at the Unit 1065, “Le Centre Méditerranéen de Médecine Moléculaire” (C3M), at the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis (France)

From September 2015             Assistant Editor at Frontiers Molecular Biosciences.

From October 2012                 Tenure position at INSERM, Chargé de recherche de 1ère classe (CR1).

 

March 2011 – Dec 2015           Avenir/INSERM Group Leader in “Le Centre Méditerranéen de Médecine Moléculaire” (C3M), at the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis (France) - Ranked A+ by AERES (2012-2017).

 

Jan. 2009 – Feb. 2011              Assistant Project Biologist at the University of California, San Diego (CA), School of Medicine, Dept. of Medicine.  

 

Oct. 2004 – Dec. 2008              Second Post-Doctoral Training at the University of California, San Diego (CA), School of Medicine, Dept. of Medicine in the laboratory of Dr. Michael G. Rosenfeld.

 

Nov. 2002 − Sept. 2004             First Post-Doctoral Training at the University of Genova (Italy), School of Medicine, in the laboratory of Dr. Giorgio Corte. 

Scientific summary

My research interest is focused on discovering novel mechanisms of post-transcriptional events controlling gene expression upon cell signaling activation. Particularly, I investigate the expression control and function of small RNAs in physio-pathological contexts by using genome-wide approaches, coupled with in vivo and epidemiological studies. Briefly, gene expression control allows development, cell fate and differentiation in multicellular organism virtually having approximately the same DNA sequence in each cell. The concepts underlying gene expression regulation were initially formulated by Francois Jacob and Jacques Monod for trans-acting factors binding to specific cis-elements in either DNA (transcriptional control) or mRNA (post-transcriptional control). In the past few years post-transcriptional gene expression control has received growing attention, as results of the discovery of the widespread transcription of non-coding RNAs  (with some estimates as high as 75% in humans), which appear to be fundamentally related to the regulation of chromatin structure and post-transcriptional gene expression. The biological relevance of non-coding RNAs is particularly evident for the small non-coding RNA species, including microRNAs (miRNAs). In this context, since the creation of my team we have utilized several newly-emerging technologies to investigate the importance of the expression control and the mode of action of regulatory small RNAs in development, homeostasis, and pathological events. Our experimental strategy is to use different high-throughput experimental approaches, including mass-spectrometry and deep sequencing analysis, as well as mouse models and epidemiological studies for metabolic disorders. 

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